Main content

Exhibit Concept and Content

This web exhibit is a companion to historian and biographer Susan Ware’s 2019 book Why They Marched: Untold Stories of the Women Who Fought for the Right to Vote. Order from Harvard University Press or Amazon.

Team

Susan Ware
Writer

Lola Van Wagenen
Executive Producer and Co-Director

Melanie Gustafson
Producer and Co-Director

Paul Hansen, Ecopixel
Website Design and Development

Text

Text excerpted from WHY THEY MARCHED: Untold Stories of the Women Who Fought for the Right to Vote by Susan Ware, published by Harvard University Press. Copyright 2019 by the President and Fellows of Harvard College. Used by permission. All rights reserved.

Image Credits

Introduction: Benjamin M. Dale (artist), Official Program, Woman Suffrage Procession, Washington, D.C., March 3, 1913, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Reference and image source.

#1—1912 Ballot Box, Chicago

  • Object: Courtesy of Chicago History Museum.
  • Wallpaper: Rand McNally & Co.’s New Street Number Guide Map of Chicago (Chicago: Rand McNally, 1912). Image source.

#2—“Leaders of the Woman’s Rights Convention Taking an Airing” (1848)

  • Object: Courtesy of Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.
  • Wallpaper: P. J. Browne, Map of Seneca County, New York: From Original Surveys (Addison, N.Y.: A. G. Gillett [1858]), Geography and Map Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Image source.

#3—Sojourner Truth’s Carte de Visite

  • Object: Courtesy of Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.
  • Wallpaper: Inventory of Charles Hardenbergh, Deceased, 1810. Reprinted in Corinne Nyquist, “On the Trail of Sojourner Truth in Ulster County, New York,” Sojourner Truth Library, State University of New York at New Paltz, New Paltz, New York. Image source.

#4—Lucy Stone: “I Take Her Paper”

  • Object: Courtesy of Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.
  • Wallpaper: Woman's Journal, January 8, 1870, Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Image source.

#5—The Woman’s Exponent

  • Object: Courtesy of Brigham Young University Special Collections.
  • Wallpaper: O. W. Gray, Gray’s Atlas of the United States (Philadelphia: Stedman, Brown, and Lyon, 1873), David Rumsey Map Collection, Green Library, Stanford University, Stanford, California. Image source.

#6—Anti-Suffrage Button

  • Object: Courtesy of Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.
  • Wallpaper: Phil Hanna, The Anti-Suffrage Rose Song, (Boston: Women’s Anti-Suffrage Association, 1915), Lester S. Levy Sheet Music Collection, Sheridan Libraries & University Museums, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland. Image source.

#7—“Make the Southern States White”

  • Object: Courtesy of Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Box 683, Breckinridge Family Papers.
  • Wallpaper: “Suffragists Turn To South for Recruits,” Charlotte Daily Observer, Sunday, May 31, 1914, page 12.

#8—“A Colored Woman in a White World”

  • Object: Courtesy of Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.
  • Wallpaper: Mary Church Terrell, “Report on Zurich Conference, 1919,” Mary Church Terrell Papers, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress. Image source.

#9—Suffragists Abroad: Budapest, 1913

  • Object: Courtesy of Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.
  • Wallpaper: “Bartholomew’s Chart of the World on Mercator’s Projection,” ([Edinburgh]: Edinburgh Geographical Institute, [1914]). Map reproduction courtesy of the Norman B. Leventhal Map & Education Center at the Boston Public Library, Boston, Massachusetts. Image source.

#10—Washington Women’s Cook Book

  • Object: Courtesy of Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.
  • Wallpaper: Henry Mayer (artist), “The Awakening,” Puck Magazine, February 20, 1915. Image source.

#11—Harvard League for Woman Suffrage

  • Object: Courtesy of Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.
  • Wallpaper: “Men’s League for Women Suffrage March in 1915 Parade,” New York Herald [1915], Carrie Chapman Catt Papers, Special Collections Department, Bryn Mawr College Library. Reprinted in Julia Corrice, Susan Goodier, and Sally Roesch Wagner, “Recognizing Women’s Right to Vote in New York State,” New York Heritage Digital Collections. Image source.

#12—Claiborne Catlin’s Saddlebags

  • Object: Courtesy of Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.
  • Wallpaper: Road Map of the Boston District Showing the Metropolitan Park System (Boston: George H. Walker and Company, 1905), Geography and Map Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Image source.

#13—The 1913 Suffrage Parade

  • Object: Courtesy of Library of Congress, LC-USZ62-20185.
  • Wallpaper: Bain News Service (publisher), “Head of Suffrage Parade, 1913,” Bain Collection, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Image source.

#14—Suffrage Bluebirds

  • Object: Courtesy of Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.
  • Wallpaper: “Boylston Street,” Detroit Publishing Company, [1910]. Image source.

#15—Foreign-Language Fliers

  • Object: Courtesy of Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.
  • Wallpaper: F. E. Redmond (photographer), “Emily Pierson Handing out Leaflets in New York State Suffrage Campaign,” [1915], National Woman’s Party Records, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Image source.

#16—“What is Feminism? Come and Find Out”

  • Object: Courtesy of the New York Historical Society.
  • Wallpaper: Vintage Postcard, “Cooper Square By Night. New York,” Ephemeral New York. Image source.

#17—National Woman’s Party Prison Pin

  • Object: Courtesy of Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.
  • Wallpaper: “Vida Milholland in Prison,” Records of the National Woman’s Party, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Image source.

#18—Woman’s Land Army Buckle

  • Object: Courtesy of Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.
  • Wallpaper: Herbert A. Paus (artist), “The Woman’s Land Army of America,” [1918], Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Image source.

#19—“Any good Suffragist the morning after”

  • Object: Courtesy of Schlesinger Library, Radcliffe Institute, Harvard University.
  • Wallpaper: Harris & Ewing (photographer), “In Front of the National Woman’s Party Headquarters, Washington, D.C.,” [1920], Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Image source.

Conclusion: Wallpaper: Harris & Ewing (photographer), “National Woman's Party members walking with banners during the dedication ceremonies for the Alva E. Belmont House,” [1922], National Woman’s Party Records, Manuscript Division, Library of Congress, Washington, D.C. Image source.